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three steps to being…

In March 2020, at the start of quarantine and stay-at-home-orders, PFLAG National launched the PFLAG Connects newsletter, that provides online support, education, and advocacy toolsm to keep you connected even as you socially distance. The “Three Steps to Being…” has been a regular feature and includes fantastic recommendations for anyone looking to grow their ally skills. 

Here are the examples that were recently featured in the PFLAG Academy Online workshop “What the Plus: Understanding and Supporting Expansive Identities”

Three Steps to Being a Better Ally to People Who are Bi+ and Pansexual (While You’re Stuck at Home) 

  1. Learn: Spend some time browsing through the resources available on the Bisexual Resource Center, Bisexual Organizing Project, and Bi.org websites to learn more about the bi+/pan community and better equip yourself to dispel common myths about people who identify as bisexual or pansexual.
     
  2. Watch: Check out the July 2020 Something to Talk About Live with PFLAG National staff where we discussed common misconceptions about the bi+/pan community and ways to stop bi+ erasure. You can also do a quick search for terms like “bisexual” and “pansexual” on YouTube to hear the stories of people who identify as bi+/pan in their own words.  
     
  3. Share: Use social media to share information and resources about Celebrate Bisexuality Day (September 23) and Pansexual Pride Day (December 8) and do your best to elevate bi+/pan advocates all year long.

Three Steps to Being a Better Ally to People Who Are Ace & Aro (While You’re Stuck at Home) 

  1. Learn: Spend some time browsing through the resources available on the Asexuality Visibility and Education Network (AVEN), Aromantic-spectrum Union for Recognition, Education, and Advocacy (AUREA), and TheAce and Aro Advocacy Project (TAAAP) websites to learn more about asexuality and aromanticism.
     
  2. Watch: Check out last week’s Something to Talk About Live with Jean-Marie Navetta and Angela Chen, author of Ace: What Asexuality Reveals About Desire, Society, and the Meaning of Sex, where they focused on the experiences of asexual and aromantic people in the US. You can also do a quick search for terms like “asexual” and “aromantic” on YouTube to hear the stories of people who identify as ace/aro in their own words.  
     
  3. Share: Use social media to share information and resources about Aromantic Spectrum Awareness Week (coming up February 21-27, 2021!) and Ace Week (which typically happens during the last full week of October).

Three Steps to Being a Better Ally to People Who Are Intersex (While You’re Stuck at Home) 

  1. Learn: Spend some time browsing through the resources available on the InterACT, Intersex Campaign for Equality, and #4Intersex websites to learn more about the experiences of people with intersex conditions and the work being done to stop harmful and unnecessary medical treatments.
     
  2. Watch: Check out What Does Intersex Mean? from the InQueery video series released by them. and this 2015 video from Buzzfeed videos titled What It’s Like To Be Intersex.  
     
  1. Share: Use social media to share information and resources about Intersex Awareness Day (October 26) and think about ways you can adapt these 26 recommendations for allies to create visibility for people who have intersex conditions all year long.